momentum

Photographic Mind - Hive's Dana Rogers is the UK Student Employee of the Year

Most well-functioning campus workplaces at the University of Kentucky have one thing in common: student workers.

Mapping the Abstract: Jenny Rice

Most of us associate mapping with cartography, but that's not always the case. The Committee on Social Theory is presenting a graduate-level course on mapping this semester and Jenny Rice, assistant professor in the Division of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media, is one of its four instructors. Jeremy Crampton, Jeffrey Peters, and Susan Larson are also teaching sections of the class, each talking about a different aspect of mapping. In this interview, Rice talked about the ways we can 'map' ideas and arguments. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

 

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Reshaping Writing Instruction

Adam Banks, associate professor in the UK Division of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media, will serve as chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), a professional organization of teachers of writing as well as scholars in rhetoric, composition and literacy studies.

The History of Hip: Thomas Marksbury

The words “hip” and “hipster” carry around a lot of baggage. Often, due to misconceptions, "hipster" is used as an insult meant to suggest some sort of failed or inauthentic attempt at being "hip." But what if that isn’t what “hip” is? What if “hip” isn’t some obsession with the fleeting but a more permanent state?

Professor Thomas Marksbury hopes to address some of these questions this coming spring semester in his class UKC 310: History Of Hip. The class, which satisfies a UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities, will encourage students to trace their own paths through the history of “hip”, a meditation on its permutations  throughout history and those individuals who embodied it.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

2012 Presidential Town Hall Debate: Students Analyze the Candidates' Performances

In the weeks and months leading up to the 2012 election, the University of Kentucky and the College of Arts and Sciences held events to help students become more engaged with the political process. One such event, as detailed in another article, was a collective viewing of the second of three Presidential debates this season.

Presented by the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media and organized by Brandy Scalise, the event also featured a panel of faculty members who discussed the issues most pressing in this campaign and their intersection with student interests. Political science professor Stephen Voss discussed student loan debt with the debate viewing audience while history professors Paul Chamberlin and David Hamilton covered foreign policy and the broader economic issues of the campaign respectively.

Along with the debate viewing, the WRD Department also facilitated conversation groups for students the following night. WRD department faculty guided student conversations and encouraged them to thoughtfully engage one another on the various topics discussed by the candidates which included manufacturing, energy, and the wars in the middle east.

In this podcast, students react to the debate between President Obama and Governor Romney and discuss the ways in which both the debates and the campaigns affect them.

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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Following the Campaign Trail: Currents Fall 2012

Fall of 2012 was the perfect time to conduct a class about American electoral politics - so it was taken up as the topic for Currents, a class offered to incoming Freshmen. The course explores the 2012 election from a variety of academic perspectives - including, but not limited to, philosophy, economics, history, and, of course, political science. In this podcast, five Currents students shared their experiences with the class. 

The students interviewed are: Trevor McNary, a double major in International Studies and Economics with a minor in Arabic and Islamic Studies; Jonathan Burdick, a Chemistry major; Elisabeth Campbell, a double major in Russian and Political Science with a minor in Spanish; Kevin States, a double major in marketing & management; and Kyle Richardson, a Political Science major. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Composing with Visuals: Rachel Elliott

WRD is offering a unique course in October. A&S 100-006, Composing with Visuals, focuses on the visual aspect of digital communication skills. Rachel Elliott, who is the instructor for the course, talks about the ways students will create visuals to explore identities, tell stories, and interpret information, and present findings via photography, film, and infographics. The course begins in mid-October 2012.

For more information about the course, or to enroll, please contact your advisor.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

New Faculty 2012: Meet Brian McNely

The Division of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media is excited to welcome professor Brian McNely to its faculty!

Professor McNely joins us this fall studying how people work and interact. He researches professional writing in digital environments, tracing the writing that people do in order to find out how they get things done, how they make meaning from the work they do, and how they share that meaning with others.

This podcast is part of a series highlighting the new faculty members who joined the College of Arts and Sciences in the fall 2012 semester.

Produced by Stephen Gordinier.

 

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It Stands to Reason

By Colleen Glenn

“Welcome to the first day of class everybody.  Let’s go over the syllabus so you know what to expect in this course.”

For UK students taking Statistics 210 this summer, these familiar words have taken on new meaning. Students meet their instructors not when they enter the classroom, but when they log onto their computers.

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Rhetoric in a Multi-Modal World: Craig Crowder

Written texts, YouTube videos, podcasts - these are all means of communicating ideas to others. Craig Crowder is a graduate student in the Department of English and teaches Composition & Communication classes, WRD 110 & 111. In this podcast, Crowder discusses ways to engage students via multimedia projects, and his research, which examines social movement rhetoric in a society that uses multiple modes of communication.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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