Intermezzo - - dedicated to publishing work too long for an article and too short for a monograph has published its inaugrual book. Intermezzo is leading the way with digital longform publications, the fugure of academic scholarship. 


Intermezzo is edited by Jeff Rice, Chair of WRD. 


Professor Jan Fernheimer discusses her new project with J.T. Waldman on Kentucky Jewish life and the history of bourbon. Read in its entirety at HBI Research.

In the summer of 2013, JT Waldman and I made some curious observations taking in the sites on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. JT noticed a lot of Jewish-sounding names, like Shapira and Boehm, while touring the 


By Guy Spriggs

(Aug. 5, 2015) — Started in the summer of 2012 as an intensive “boot camp” to help the University of Kentucky’s new students prepare for college-level calculus, the FastTrack program has become an integral part of efforts to help students transition to the college classroom and set them up for success in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The curriculum for FastTrack has expanded over the last four years, and now gives students an invaluable introduction to UK’s math, biology, chemistry, engineering, Spanish and WRD (Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies). A key part of the program’s continued growth is the recent addition of FOCUS (FastTrack Orientation for College Undergraduate Success), a component built around developing the non-academic skills students need to achieve in coursework.


By Whitney Harder

(Sept. 3, 2015) — Who said reading only had one season? Sure, fall is approaching and life is getting busy, but an interesting book could be the perfect way to wind down after those jam-packed days, or to inspire you for the week ahead. For professors at the University of Kentucky, books have impacted their lives and careers in surprising ways.

Read below for the second in a series of professors reflecting on the books that shaped them, and you just may find a title or two to add to your own bookshelf. 

Christia Brown

Associate Professor of Psychology

One of the most influential books I ever read was Toni Morrison’s "The Bluest Eye," which I read my first year of college as a class assignment. It forced me, as a white girl from Tennessee, to evaluate and come


WRD faculty have been busy this summer.

In June, Jim Ridolfo participated in A&S' Passport to the World initiative and travelled to Jordan and Morocco for a faculty development seminar. 

Jenny Rice gave an invited talk at Bar Ilan University this June entitled "What Are the Digital Humanities and Why Should We Care?"

Jeff Rice gave an invited talk at Bar Ilan University this June entitled "Digital Outragicity."

Brian McNely published a visual documentary entitled "The 4th on Film."

Along with Sara Alvarez, in July, Steve Alvarez taught a four day Personal Statement course at Bluegrass Community Technical College.

Steve Alvarez also received a Smith Symposium Fellowship to attend the Southern Foodways Alliance Symposium in Oxford, Mississippi this October. 


By Blair Hoover

(July 6, 2015) — In support of the College of Arts and Sciences’ Passport to the World Initiative and the 2015 Year of the Middle East campaign, University of Kentucky Education Abroad partnered with the college to sponsor a faculty development seminar in the Middle East focusing on contemporary issues pertinent to the region.

The seminar was developed to provide faculty members with an opportunity to gain firsthand experience with the issues concerning the region and thus, to better equip them to share their knowledge and experience with their students and subsequent international initiatives, such as developing institutional partnerships and further education abroad programming at UK.

The following faculty members were selected to


By Sarah Schuetze

“We thought we’d do one more run,” said Cory Zigmund about a trip he took to Colorado to visit his brother during the summer of 2013. They were on a backcountry glacier and planned to hike to the top and snowboard down. On the ride down, Zigmund hit a ditch on the rough slope and wiped out, completely dislocating his shoulder. As a trained U.S. Navy SEAL medic, Zigmund knew how to fix it, but his brother had to do it. Step-by-step, he walked his brother through the processes of popping his bone back into joint so they could complete the run.

Zigmund has filled his life with adventures — most of which have not required impromptu medical assistance on the face of a glacier. But even the especially challenging ones haven’t discouraged him from taking advantage of an opportunity to explore something new.

Hiking, climbing, snowboarding, and diving


Our age is an age of writing. Social media. Podcasts. Websites. Video. News. Stories. Analysis. Critique. Reports. Advertisements. Technical documentation. Writing is everywhere we look. 

WRD prepares you for a career in writing. Every industry includes writing. Every industry supports the writing of internal and external documents (memos, reports, technical documents, research studies, social media usage, website development). Every industry sponsors trade writing (magazines, journals, newsletters, other publications). 

WRD prepares you for a career as a writer. Scientists write. Engineers write. Those who work in the horse industry write. Brewers write. Chemists write. Nurses write. If you are a professional, you write. 

Imagine yourself a lawyer drawing on argumentative, research, and storytelling skills you learned in WRD.

Imagine yourself working for


By Kathy Johnson

(April 17, 2015) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  Today, Godell talks to Lexington Herald-Leader columnist Tom Eblen and Peter Brackney, author of “Lost Lexington,” — both are winners of Excellence in Writing awards from UK's Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies (WRD).  Jenny Rice, associate professor and director of composition, WRD, also joins the conversation.

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit


By Gail Hairston

(April 14, 2015) — As history-shattering events have a tendency to do, a quiet little revolution has been developing on the horizon. It has dodged in and out of the headlines for a couple of decades without a great deal of notice in the mainstream. And yet, it could be the biggest news in human creativity since Gutenberg invented the printing press.

Experts haven’t quite settled on a name just yet — digital writing, network publishing — but both the New York Times bestselling wanna-be and the frustrated young graduate student, pounding on their keyboards in the dark hours before dawn, have a name for it — freedom. No longer must a new writer seek out attorneys and publicists and agents. All they must do now to reach the masses is press “enter.”

Of course, doing something well is never that easy. That’s a good reason for the University of Kentucky


By Gail Hairston

University colleges typically only celebrate the writing of their students.

The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies (WRD), however, presented its Excellence in Writing Awards to UK undergraduates as well as faculty and community writers.

Two UK faculty members and two writers who are well known to Lexingtonians were honored April 13, in the Colombia Room of the Boone Center (view the full program).   

Typically, faculty are honored only in their disciplines for achievements and contributions and not for their writing. WRD is proud to step out of that box to honor Shannon Bell,


By Gail Hairston

(March 24, 2015) — University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Year of the Middle East has scheduled three events this week. They are:

“The Arab Spring: The Youth Revolts of the Arab World Aren't Over” with Juan Cole

Tuesday, March 24, 7 p.m.

UK Athletics Association Auditorium, William T. Young Library

The youth revolts of 2011 and after in the Arab world have permanently changed the face of the region. While most observers have mainly interpreted them through the lens of high politics, this lecture argues that the big story here is the rise of a new generation of young Arabs, the Millennials, who have innovated in grassroots organization (including, but not limited to new ways of using social media for politics). It is too soon to know how the political struggles that they initiated will end, but it is certain that a new


by: Lydia Whitman

(Feb. 2, 2015) — The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Science's Committee on Social Theory will host its 2015 lecture series, “Transnational Lives,” throughout the spring semester. This well-established series, organized around a different topic each year, gives the public access to lectures by four international scholars visiting the university campus to address a particular aspect of social theoretical thought from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. All lectures will be held on Fridays at 2 p.m. and are free to the public.

Committee director Marion Rust said these are among “the most exciting intellectual opportunities available to the UK community.”


by Sarah Schuetze

Sitting at the front of the room at a seminar table crowded with more students than anyone imagined, professor Francie Chassen-Lopez said, “I always say I have one foot on either side of the border.”

Chassen-Lopez is one of the four instructors teaching Social Theory 600, a graduate seminar called “Transnational Lives.” The professors include Ana Liberato, Cristina Alcalde, and Steven Alvarez—each representing a different discipline and approach to the course. “What makes this so exciting,” Alcalde said, “is we’re all coming at this from different perspectives.”

In many ways,


By Sarah Schuetze

As a graduate student at Michigan State University in 2008, Jim Ridolfo embarked on what he thought was a short-term research project that diverged from his dissertation work. This “secondary” project on Samaritan manuscripts has led to nationally-funded, award-winning research. 

An article that stemmed from his “side project,” “Delivering Textual Diaspora: Building Digital Cultural Repositories as Rhetoric Research,” was published by College English in November 2013

Photo c. 1915-20 of UK science lab.

by Gail Hairston 

(Sept. 30, 2014) — More than an “s” has been added since the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Science was created in 1908 with only seven faculty members. In fact there was a College of Arts and Science even before the institution was named the University of Kentucky; the institution was called the State University, Lexington, Kentucky (previously Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky and State College) until 1916.

In those 106 years, several of today’s largest colleges were birthed from the original College of Arts and Science’s former programs, including today’s College of Education, College of Communication and Information, College of Social Work and College of Fine Arts.

The college grew quickly under the inspiration and commitment of President James Patterson, whose statue now graces the plaza next to the Patterson


The Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky invites applications for Chair at the rank of Advanced Associate or Full Professor. We seek applications from individuals with outstanding leadership skills, administrative experience, and a strong publishing record. We are particularly interested in candidates who can plan, articulate and implement a vision to lead the department over the next five years.

(Sept. 9, 2014) ‒ One of the most respected American scholarly authority on Islam, John L. Esposito, will visit the University of Kentucky Wednesday to discuss “The Future of Islam: Assessing the Elements of Reform, Revival, and Fundamentalism in the Muslim World.” The community is invited to attend his presentation at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the Singletary Center Recital Hall.    The event is part of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Passport to the World 2014-15 program Year of the Middle East: Crossroads of the World.   A professor of Islamic Studies and International Affairs at Georgetown University, Esposito will discuss his book on the portrait of Islam today and tomorrow, drawn by a lifetime of thought and research to sweep away the


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