Current Courses

Fall 2014

(Scroll down for previous semesters)

UKC 110-001: HUM INQUIRY: FACEBOOK SOCIAL MEDIA – Jeff Rice (TR 12:30-1:45 in CB 208) Explore the complexity of social media and its cultural, political, economic, and personal effects. We will study online argumentation, visual writing, affective thinking, participation, social networking, and transmedia storytelling – all of which are features social media engage with in order to be successful. Fulfills UK Core: Humanities

UKC 382-001: RHETORICS OF CITIZENSHIP – Katherine Rogers-Carpenter (TR 9:30-10:45 in CB 333) Explores how rhetoric has shaped evolving notions of U.S. citizenship with case studies ranging from early 20th century labor disputes, women’s suffrage, McCarthyism, integration, to the Black Power Movement. Fulfills UK Core requirement: U.S. Citizenship.

UK 100-011, 012, 104-019: UNIV CR: WRITING WORKSHOP - See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors Part of UK Academic Prep Program (APP), designed to coach students to master critical college analytical writing concepts while including multiple points of intervention and access to resources in support of students’ regular course work.

WRD 110: COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I – See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors 1st course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Fulfills UK Core: C&C I

WRD 111: COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II – See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors 2nd of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110.  Fulfills UK Core: C&C II

WRD 112: ACCELERATED COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II – See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors Accelerated version of the standard two-semester C&C sequence; focuses on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development and emphasizes critical inquiry and research.  Prereq: AP Eng Comp score 4 or 5; ACT Eng sore 32+ or SAT Writing score 720+; acceptance into Univ Honors Program. Fulfills UK Core: C&C

WRD 130-001: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOP:  MULTIMEDIA SANDBOX – Rachel Elliott (Begins 10/20/2014 MW 3:00-5:30 in LCLI 004B) This 8-week studio class focuses on creative production using word and image combinations. Students use high-tech multimedia communication tools such as photography, Photoshop, video and video editing, as well as low-tech multimedia tools such as drawing storyboards and comics. Students leave the class with multimedia skills and creativity exercises that they will be able to apply to classes within their own major and to their future careers.

WRD 130-002, 003, & 004: INTRODUCTORY WORKSHOP:  EDIT DOCUMENTARY – Rachel Elliott (Meeting times TBD) Hands-on instruction brainstorming, planning, filming, and editing documentary videos. Students must also register for WRD 312 which accompanies this course.

WRD 203: BUSINESS WRITING – See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors Provides instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  Fulfills GWR

WRD 204-001: TECHNICAL WRITING – Brian McNely (TR 3:30-4:45 in OT 113) Provides instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis is placed on precision, clarity, and conciseness in preparing rhetorically effective letters, proposals, reports, and presentations for specific audiences. Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  Fulfills GWR

WRD 205-001: WRITING & RHETORIC:  MULTIMEDIA WRITING – Josh Abboud (MWF 12:00-12:50 in OT 113) Develops a practical understanding of writing modes using multimedia platforms and artifacts. Students will learn how to apply rhetorical concepts in order to produce and publish to the web and other venues in a range of media such as digital video and photography, blogs, wikis, podcasts, comics, and many others. Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  Fulfills GWR

WRD 205-003: WRITING & RHETORIC: MYTHS, FAIRYTALES & REIMAGININGS – Brandy Scalise (TR 12:30-1:45 in CB 241) Gregory Maguire’s novel turned musical, Wicked; Darren Aronofsky’s blockbuster, Noah; and ABC’s hit series, Once Upon a Time, differ dramatically in medium and purpose. But all these works share a genre: they deliver their message through the retelling of a classic myth or tale. Students will develop their skills in textual analysis and critical thinking as they examine these and other reimagined stories. Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  Fulfills GWR

WRD/ENG 301:  STYLE FOR WRITERS 001 Beth Connors Manke (MWF 11:00-11:50 in TPC 101) 002: Bill Endres (TR 12:30-1:45 in CB 217) – Designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement or consent of instructor.

WRD 312-001 and 002: INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY – Tom Marksbury (001 MWF 11:00-11:50 in KAS 210 and 002 MWF 12:00-12:50 in KAS 210) Dedicated to critical examination of approaches to the documentary, and the construction of a documentary of one's own.  Students will examine different strategies, structures, and topics, with an eye to production. Students must also register for WRD 130-001-004 which accompanies this course. Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement or consent of instructor.

WRD/ENG 401-001: SP TOP IN WRITING: COMICS & CONFLICT IN ISRAEL/PALESTINE – Jan Fernheimer (TR 9:30-10:45 in OT 03) ­Though Israel/Palestine, peace, conflict, and the Middle East appear frequently in the daily news, people often don’t understand what all the fuss is about, and why the conflict(s) appear so seemingly unsolvable. Course will offer a unique opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the many conflicts within and between Israeli and Palestinian societies by looking at them through the lens of graphic narratives. Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

WRD/ENG 401-002: SP TOP IN WRITING: WRITING WITH ANIMALS – Roxanne Mountford (TR 12:30-1:45 in OT 03) What makes animals different from us?  This question has engaged philosophers, scientists, animal trainers, and ordinary people who love wildlife or have animal companions.  Anything we might write about non-human animals depends upon our answer to this basic question.  Students will read widely about animals, encounter them in the local environment, and write about them in various forms of nonfiction prose, all the while exploring their assumptions about them.  Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

WRD/ENG 401-003: SP TOP IN WRITING: RHETORIC & POLITICS OF THE BLACK SERMON – Adam Banks (TR 2:00-3:15 in MAIN 5) Prereq: Completion of C&C requirement.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

WRD 402-001: AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL COMP: COMPOSING AUTOETHNOGRAPHY – Steven Alvarez (TR 12:30-1:45 in OT 110) Many of us enjoy “people watching,” observing how different groups of people speak, dress, behave, and interact with others. Workshop in writing about people watching but reflexively turned toward our points of views. We will put our people watching skills to the test as we apply them to our own communities and families, or other groups with whom we closely identify. We will conduct fieldwork within our communities and compose texts involving our autobiographies.

ENG 609-001: COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS – William Endres (TR 9:30-10:45 in CB 305) A course in theory and practice of teaching composition to the college level.  Required of 1st-year teaching assistants.

 

Spring 2014

UKC 110-001: Why Do We Love Facebook? Social Media: Theory, Culture, Politics, Practice – Jeff Rice (TR 2-3:15)

In this course, we will explore the complexity of social media and its cultural, political, economic, and personal effects. We will study online argumentation, visual writing, affective thinking, participation, social networking, and transmedia storytelling – all of which are features social media engage with in order to be successful. Fulfills UK Core: Humanities

UKC 310-001:  THE HISTORY OF HIP – Thomas Marksbury (MWF 1-1:50)

The project here is to trace the evolution of the constantly shifting notion of Hip as—opposed to the cliché notion of something “merely” hip as faddish andephemeral—an indelible and enduring parallel universe to established canonical notions of literature, music, visual art, film, standup comedy, the graphic novel, the very notion of performance itself as it pertains not only to art but to the very presentation of self. Fulfills UK Core: Humanities

WRD 130-001:  INTRO STUDIO:  MULTIMEDIA SANDBOX – Rachel Elliott (MW 3-5:00) Begins 3/12/14

This 8-week studio class focuses on creative production using word and image combinations. Students use high-tech multimedia communication tools such as photography, Photoshop, video and video editing, as well as low-tech multimedia tools such as drawing storyboards and comics. Students leave the class with multimedia skills and creativity exercises that they will be able to apply to classes within their own major and to their future careers.

WRD 204-001:  TECHNICAL WRITING – William Endres (TR 12:30-1:45)                

This course provides instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis is placed on precision, clarity, and conciseness in preparing rhetorically effective letters, proposals, reports, and presentations for specific audiences. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement. Fulfills Graduation Writing Requirement (GWR)         

WRD 205-001: WRITING AND RHETORIC: MULTIMEDIA WRITING – Josh Abboud (MWF 12-12:50)

This course will develop a practical understanding of writing modes using multimedia platforms and artifacts. Students will learn how to apply rhetorical concepts in order to produce and publish to the web and other venues in a range of media such as digital video and photography, blogs, wikis, podcasts, comics, and many others. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduation Writing Requirement (GWR)

WRD 205-002:  WRITING AND RHETORIC: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE Jim Ridolfo (TR 9:30-10:45)

In this course we will explore core issues in rhetoric and professional writing through the lens of a course simulation based on an imaginary zombie apocalypse. After applying for a position at a fake company, students will work individually and in groups to produce digital writing projects to help save Lexington from the brink of apocalypse. In the process, students will learn key concepts in rhetorical theory, professional writing, and digital composing and will be prepared to take more advanced courses in Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduation Writing Requirement (GWR)

WRD 205-003:  WRITING AND RHETORICJewish Graphic Novel – Janice Fernheimer (TR 12:30-1:45)

 This course provides an introduction to graphic novels and Jewish culture by focusing on Jewish-authored graphic novels on “Jewish” subjects. Students will learn about the creation of the graphic novel genre, its specific rhetorical affordances combining visuals and text in sequence, and how it came to be associated with Jews, Jewish culture, and “Jewish writing.”  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduation Writing Requirement (GWR)

WRD 205-004:  WRITING AND RHETORICRHETORIC & EPIDEMICS – Katherine Rogers-Carpenter (TR 3:30-4:45)

In 1902, Thomas Alva Edison envisioned a world in which “The doctor … will give no medicine, but will interest his patients in the care of the human frame, in diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.”  But, as the recent avian flu outbreak and resurgence of tuberculosis show, we aren’t there yet.  Instead, the CDC and other world health organizations vigilantly monitor different diseases while pharmaceutical companies continually develop vaccines in anticipation of deadly epidemics.  If disease has helped shape history, the discourse surrounding it is equally powerful.  In this section of WRD 205, we will interpret, analyze, and evaluate the rhetorical strategies surrounding disease. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduation Writing Requirement (GWR)

WRD/ENG 301-001 and -002:  STYLE FOR WRITERS – William Endres (-001 tr 9:30-10:45; -002 TR 2-3:15)

This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor. NOTE:  Consent of instructor is automatic, so contact diane.robertson@uky.edu or 859-281-2867 for prereq override.

WRD 324:  WRITING CENTER PEER TUTORING - Judith Prats (TBD)

An undergraduate seminar that prepares qualified undergraduate students to become engaged and effective peer consultants in the UK Writing Center. Students in the course are actively involved in reading, writing, listening, observing, speaking, researching, and presenting as they become immersed in the theory and practice of Writing Center consulting. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

WRD/ENG 401-001: Sp Top in Writing: TV & ITS DISCONTENTS – Thomas Marksbury (MWF 10-10:50)

An examination of the so-called “Third Golden Age of Television”, roughly from the mid-1990s to the present.  The emphasis is on programming from the networks under pressure as they gave way to primarily HBO and the great cable series which followed, shows which proved to be the equivalent of 19th century social realism for the 21st century.  Keeping Dickens and Tolstoy in mind as literary progenitors, has television eclipsed film as the predominate narrative art form of the new millennium?  We will look into both “arthouse” and genre oriented programming. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits NOTE:  Consent of instructor is automatic, so contact diane.robertson@uky.edu or 859-281-2867 for prereq override.

WRD/ENG 401-002: Sp Top in Writing: Work Stories-Writing about Labor – Katherine Rogers-Carpenter (TR 9:30-10:45)

If the bureau of labor statistics is right, Americans spend roughly one third of their waking hours working. And, while we may complain about our pay or bosses, most of us don’t give our jobs much serious thought. In "Work Stories," the class will read a range of texts about employment and labor (including Studs Terkel's Working). We will also view films about work such as Freedom Writers and Glengarry Glenn Ross.  Based on the course texts and observational writing, students will develop non-fiction essays which explore how work figures in their lives.. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits  NOTE:  Consent of instructor is automatic, so contact diane.robertson@uky.edu or 859-281-2867 for prereq override.

WRD/ENG 401-003: Sp Top in Writing: TRAVEL WRITING – Randall Roorda (TR 2-3:15)

In this course we’ll read travel writing (a broad genre, from lofty literature to lowdown guidebook fodder), writing on travel (as historical phenomenon and object of desire), and writing about writing as travel (the mind’s motion through present, remembered, and projected landscapes). We’ll travel and write on travel ourselves, in notebooks, travelogues, and essays. The course is participatory and workshop-based, its territory demarcated but destinations uncertain and itinerary open. Course grading will split about equally between daily work—reading response, on-site notebook writing, drafting essays and responding to drafts of others—and a portfolio of finished writing, some fifteen-plus pages. Since a course on travel had best involve actual travel, I’ll organize daytrips (two of them, probably, on Fridays or Saturdays) to regional tourist venues, one or the other of which will be mandatory. Yet since travel is not just movement but also a stance, an attitude toward experience (such that Thoreau could quip he’d “travelled a good deal in Concord,” his own home town), what we learn and do should affect our view of local circumstances as well. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of 6 credits NOTE:  Consent of instructor is automatic, so contact diane.robertson@uky.edu or 859-281-2867 for prereq override.

WRD 405-001:  EDITING ENGLISH PROSE – Brandy Scalise (MWF 11-11:50)

You can spot all the awkward passages in your roommate’s history paper, but can you fix them? Build upon your knowledge of the elements of writing and style by learning the basics of editing and publishing. The course includes a broad introduction to best editing practices, as applied in literary, academic, business, and online writing. Prereq: WRD 301 or consent of instructor.

WRD 412-001:  INTERMEDIATE DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION – Thomas Marksbury (MW 3-4:15)

Picking up where Intro to Documentary (WRD 312) left off—the Intro course is listed as a prerequisite but you are encouraged to approach the instructor for consent even if you haven’t taken it—this course focuses on both more recent and/or experimental documentaries and a more ambitious documentary of your own.  Like the 312, this is a hybrid course, concentrating on close readings of various approaches to the form but culminating in a workshop along the lines of studio art or creative writing, where we work as a community of documentarians to produce our own short (probably twelve to eighteen minute) films. Prereq: Completion of WRD 312 or consent of the instructor.

A&S 100-003:  SP INTRO CRSE: MULTIMEDIA SANDBOX Rachel Elliott (MWF 1-1:50)

2 credit course 1/15/14 – 4/2/14 for Wired students only.

A&S 100-004:  SP INTRO CRSE: MEXINGTON, KENTUCKY Steven Alvarez (TR 12:30-1:45)

2 credit course 1/15/14 – 4/2/14 for Wired students only.

A&S 100-005:  SP INTRO CRSE: MUSICAL STORIES Jeffrey Rice (TR 12:30-1:45)

2 credit course 1/15/14 – 4/2/14 for Wired students only.

WRD 110:  COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION I See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors

Composition & Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Fulfills UK Core: C&C I

WRD 111:  COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION II See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors

Composition & Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110.  Fulfills UK Core: C&C II

WRD 112:  ACCELERATED COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors

Composition & Communication 112 is an accelerated version of the standard two-semester composition and communication sequence.  It focuses on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development and emphasizes critical inquiry and research.  Fulfills UK Core: C&C

WRD 203: BUSINESS WRITING See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors

This course provides instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills GWR

Fall 2013

ENG 205:  INTERMEDIATE WRITING -001: Jesslyn Collins-Frohlich MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM     -002: Jesslyn Collins-Frohlich  MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM
Specific topics will be available later.  An open topics writing course focused on rhetorical analysis of issues of academic, political, social, or cultural significance. Students will interpret, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies employed in print and digital texts. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduate Writing Requirement  

ENG 205-003:  WRITING LEXINGTON'S (JEWISH) PAST -- Janice W. Fernheimer TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM
Did you know that the University of Kentucky was home to a Jewish Fraternity (Zeta Beta Tau) and Jewish sorority (Phi Sigma Sigma) in the early part of the 20th century? Did you that at one point, most of Lexington’s downtown was populated by Jewish-owned shops?   Did you know that the Lexington cemetery has a special section dedicated to Jewish burials? Students in this class will learn about these and other aspects of Lexington’s Jewish heritage. They will explore the multi-ethnic fabric of Lexington’s, past, present,  and future by working directly with primary materials and oral histories  in the University of Kentucky’s Louie B. Nunn  Center for Oral History and Special Collections libraries.  Class assignments may include indexing and curating materials in the Louie B. Nunn  Center for Oral History project, creating a video oral history with a Lexington Jewish  community member,  and/or self-reflective and academic essays. Students will learn about composition and presentation strategies in a variety of media including, but not limited to traditional print, video,visual, and oral modes.

ENG 609-001:  COMPOSITION FOR TEACHERS – William F. Endres TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM
A course in theory and practice of teaching composition to the college level.  Required of 1st-year teaching assistants.

UKC 100-003 & -004:  MULTIMEDIA SANDBOX – Rachel Elliott MW 11:00 AM-1:30 PM LCLI 004B (2 consecutive 8-wk sessions)
This course is an eight week studio class focusing on rhetorical creative production with multimedia communication tools such as photography & photoshop, video & video editing, and creative data visualization. Students will recognize and develop their own strengths and interests through project-based learning, and leave the class with multimedia skills and creativity exercises that they will be able to immediately apply to classes within their own major, and to their future careers.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Arts & Creativity

UKC 300:  INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY – Thomas Marksbury -001: MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM-002: MWF 1:00 PM-1:50 PM     
This course is dedicated to critical examination of approaches to the documentary, and the construction of a documentary of one's own. Students will examine different strategies, structures, and topics, with an eye to production. Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Arts & Creativity

UKC 380-001:  AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL COMPOSITION:  COMPOSING AUTOETHNOGRAPHY – Steven P. Alvarez
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM WTYL B35
Workshop in writing about people watching, and how we perceive people watching us. We will conduct fieldwork within our communities and compose texts involving our autobiographies.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Community, Culture & Citizenship

UKC 381-001:  ARGUMENTATION – Jennifer H. Rice TR 2:00 PM-3:15 PM
“Deliberation, Persuasion, and Bullshit in the Public Sphere" examines how key cultural issues (from historical issues like slavery to current issues like immigration) have been argued in the public sphere. We will specifically examine three different types of rhetorical argument: deliberation, persuasion, and what philosopher Harry Frankfurt infamously labeled “bullshit.” Fulfills UK Core requirement: Community, Culture & Citizenship

WRD 110-001-085, -201, -202 (online) & -401:  COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION I 
See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors and for sections for WIRED, A-S 200, & Biology majors
Composition & Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication I

WRD 111-001-028, -201, -202 (online), -401: COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION II See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors
Composition & Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication II

WRD 112-001-010:  ACCELERATED COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II 
See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors and for sections for Honors and WIRED
Composition & Communication 112 is an accelerated version of the standard two-semester composition and communication sequence.  It focuses on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development and emphasizes critical inquiry and research.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication

WRD 203-001-014, -201, -202 (online) & 401:  BUSINESS WRITING See catalog for meeting patterns & instructors
This course provides instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduate Writing Requirement

WRD 204:  TECHNICAL WRITING – Brian J. McNely -001: TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM                  -002: TR 3:30 PM-4:45 PM   
This course provides instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis is placed on precision, clarity, and conciseness in preparing rhetorically effective letters, proposals, reports, and presentations for specific audiences. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.  Fulfills Graduate Writing Requirement     

WRD 301-001:  STYLE FOR WRITERS – Jim Ridolfo MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM
This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.

WRD 401-001:  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  GENRES OF CULTURAL CRITIQUE – Joshua M. Abboud MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM
Critique is one of the most important functions of writing. The idea of cultural critique is to hold a microscope up to cultural systems to understand how they work. In this course we will examine the examiners by analyzing the rhetorical moves and intellectual heritages of critiques of culture. Additionally we will learn how to identify and participate in the various critical conversations surrounding these genres.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits

WRD 401-002:  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  SPIRITUAL WRITING – Brandy M. Scalise TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM
Regardless of the century or denomination, the devout have consistently viewed writing as an important pathway to spiritual growth.  This course will allow students to explore different genres of spiritual writing – personal narratives, exegesis, meditations, prayers,  sermons,  and even poetry and fiction.  Students will both analyze the rhetorical characteristics of the spiritual writing of others and craft their own works. Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement or consent of instructor.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits

Spring 2013

A&S 300-002:  ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING (WRD 425) – Erik Reece
TR 11:00 AM-12:15 PM CB 303
This course will take up Aldo Leopold’s foundational idea of a land ethic and attempt to apply it to various forms of writing: narrative, reportage, experiential, and polemic. If, as Leopold said, people will not destroy what they love, how do we use writing to make people care enough about natural landscapes that they will want to work to preserve them? This course will work to answer that question. We will focus on how to write with empathy, passion, authority and concreteness. And we will examine how literary non-fiction can become a voice for advocacy and activism. 

A&S 300-003:  WRITING CENTER PEER TUTORING (WRD 324) – Judith Prats
TBD Writing Center
An undergraduate seminar that prepares qualified undergraduate students to become engaged and effective peer consultants in the UK Writing Center. Students in the course are actively involved in reading, writing, listening, observing, speaking, researching, and presenting as they become immersed in the theory and practice of Writing Center consulting. The course is required of all undergraduate students who would like to be employed as tutors in the Writing Center. 

A&S 300-006:  TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING: WRITING, RHETORIC, & USER EXPERIENCE RESEARCH (WRD 406) – Brian McNely
TR 3:30 PM-4:45 PM LCLI 004A
This course explores and then puts into practice critical theories and approaches to networked writing activity inherent in digital media platforms and applications.  We'll study contemporary user experience from a variety of perspectives, we'll make things, and we'll develop the kinds of actionable analyses professional organizations demand.  

A&S 300-007:  SOCIAL MEDIA: THEORY, CULTURE, POLITICS, PRACTICE (WRD 210) – Adam Banks 
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM
The course examines how social media and the writing practices we employ influence notions of what it means to participate in community, society, and public discourse. Students will compose across different social media platforms and explore theoretical literature to examine the ways these tools are evolving. 

A&S 500-006:  PRACTICES IN THE DIGITAL HUMANITIES – William Endres
TR 3:30 PM-4:45 PM LCLI 004B
In this course, each student will embark on his or her own digital project. These projects will involve either pursuit of a research interest or be directed to archiving and analyzing the student's own academic production, that is, essays and research notes produced during her or his time at the university. To ground these projects, we will explore the technologies and methodologies that have made the rapid growth in the Digital Humanities possible. We will analyze the types of research, publications, and archives that result from digital scholarship. We will explore textual analysis, crowdsourcing, GIS applications, data mining, mobile data collection, and visualization techniques. We will examine digital editions, experiment with a wide variety of open-source applications, and discuss the types of interpretive works made possible by digital technologies and methodologies. Andrew Prescott, Chair of Digital Humanities at King's College London, views the Digital Humanities as offering the scholarly community a vital, dynamic, and essential space where theory and making collide. This class will be such a space.

UKC 100-003 & -004:  MULTIMEDIA SANDBOX – Rachel Elliott
MW 11:00 AM-1:30 PM LCLI 004B (two consecutive 8-week sessions)
This course is an eight week studio class focusing on creative production with multimedia communication tools such as photography & photoshop, video & video editing, and creative data visualization. Students will recognize and develop their own strengths and interests through project-based learning, and leave the class with multimedia skills and creativity exercises that they will be able to immediately apply to classes within their own major, and to their future careers.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Arts & Creativity

UKC 150:  COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION (WRD 112) – 
-001 Brandy Scalise MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM CB 239 – 003 MWF 2:00 PM-2:50 PM CB 209
-002 Bill Endres TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM CB 239
Composition & Communication 112 is an accelerated version of the standard two-semester composition and communication sequence.  It focuses on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development and emphasizes critical inquiry and research.  Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modalities; and use interpersonal skills to work effectively in groups. For members of UK Honors program.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication

UKC 300-001:  INTRODUCTION TO DOCUMENTARY (WRD 312) – Thomas Marksbury
TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM
This course is dedicated to critical examination of approaches to the documentary, and the construction of a documentary of one's own. Students will examine different strategies, structures, and topics, with an eye to production. Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Arts & Creativity

UKC 310-001:  THE HISTORY OF HIP – Thomas Marksbury
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM CB 214
This course positions “hip”—in marked opposition to the popular and increasingly pejorative implications of the word as merely of the moment, fashionable, trendy, ephemeral, even disposable—as an enduring canon, subject to the same laws of evolution, stasis, and fluctuation of any other canon.  Hip is a counter-tradition, shadow of the “official” canon, with its own sources, progenitors, and evolution.  We want to trace those permutations, chart where they have taken us and speculate about where we’re going now.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Humanities

UKC 311:  INTRO TO WRITING, RHETORIC, AND DIGITAL MEDIA (WRD 300) – Roxanne Mountford
TR 2:00 PM-3:15 PM FA 208
This course introduces the rhetorical nature of all composing, from flat print media to complex multimedia production. Students will read rhetorical theory and analyze a variety of rhetorical situations that require the composition of words and images into effective messages.  They will interact with guest speakers who are faculty in the Division of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media to learn more about study in this area.  In the first half of the semester, students will be expected to gather data throughout the semester on a particular community engaged in writing and/or digital production for the public.  In the second half of the semester, students will participate in the production of messages for the public, either in the group they have already studied or for another group, and present their observations about their activities to the class.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Inquiry - Humanities

UKC 380-001:  AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL COMPOSITION:  COMPOSING AUTOETHNOGRAPHY (WRD 402) – Steven Alvarez
MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM BE 105
Many of us enjoy “people watching,” observing how different groups of people speak, dress, behave, and interact with others. This course will be a workshop in writing about people watching, and how we perceive people watching us. We will put our people watching skills to the test as we apply them to our own communities and families, or other groups with whom we closely identify. We will conduct fieldwork within our communities and compose texts about our autobiographies and the social relations we forge as members of groups, and the complex and unpredictable cultural contexts that arise in communities. Critical autoethnography is an autobiographical genre of writing and research representing to uncover multiple layers of discourse—connecting the personal to the cultural. It is an individual studying self as an individual within particular social and cultural worlds. Qualitative research and writing of the self explicitly seeks connecting the self to research/writing projects.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Community, Culture & Citizenship in the USA

Note:  Specific topics of ENG 205 will not be listed in the online catalog.

ENG 205-001:   INTERMEDIATE WRITING (MULTI-MEDIA WRITING WRD 208) – Joshua Abboud
MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM OT 145
This course develops a practical understanding of writing and rhetoric through multimedia platforms and artifacts. Students will produce and publish to the web in a range of media such as digital video and photography, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and comics. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.

ENG 205:   INTERMEDIATE WRITING – 
-002 Amber Stamper TR 11:00 AM-12:15 PM FB B9
-003 Instructor TBD TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM CB 215

ENG 205-004:  INTERMEDIATE WRITING (WRITING & RHETORIC WRD 205) Katherine Rogers-Carpenter
TR 3:30 PM-4:45 PM CB 213
An open topics writing course focused on rhetorical analysis of issues of academic, political, social, or cultural significance. Students will interpret, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies employed in print and digital texts.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.

ENG 301-001:  STYLE FOR WRITERS – Brandy Scalise 
TR 2:00 PM-3:15 PM OT 089 
This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

ENG 401-001/601-001:  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  THE ESSAY – Randall Roorda
TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM FA 308A
This is a course in reading and writing essays.  Students will explore the definition of the essay as a genre, reading many kinds of essays in an attentive, critical, and imaginative way.  They will also write essays on subjects of their choosing.  The class will function as a writer’s workshop for the latter half of the semester.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

ENG 401-002:  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  LITERARY JOURNALISM/NARRATIVE NON-FICTION – Beth Connors Manke
MWF 1:00 PM-1:50 PM BH 306
The art of fact. This genre, called by several different names (creative nonfiction, literary non-fiction), plays with the boundaries of fact and fiction, voice and style, narrative and truth. This course leans toward the literary side of the equation, often examining writers who publish both fiction and non-fiction, writers who bring their narrative skills to bear on non-fiction published for popular audiences. One strain of "literary journalism," embodied by the New Journalists and proclaimed by Tom Wolfe, believed that non-fiction—not the novel—had become “the most important literature being written in America today.” That’s a pretty grand statement, and we’ll spend the semester discerning if Wolfe is right. And, if he is right, why non-fiction has such a strong pull in the twentieth century. First, we’ll look back to some pioneers (Charles Dickens, Stephen Crane, Jack London), and then we’ll consider other innovators closer to our time (Lillian Ross, Tom Wolfe, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Martha Gellhorn, Michael Herr, and John McPhee). Along the way, we’ll try our own hand at this intensively experiential and highly researched form of writing. We’ll also consider how digital innovations in sound recording and video can transform the genre yet again. Coursework will include frequent shorter papers, a longer paper, and a digital project. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement and consent of instructor.

ENG 691:  READINGS IN RHETORIC:  CONSULTING PRACT – Roxanne Mountford
TBD Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor.

ENG 771:  SEMINAR SPECIAL TOPICS:  DEVELOPING EQUIPMENT FOR LIVING: A SEMINAR IN KENNETH BURKE – Jan Fernheimer
TR 2:00 PM-4:30 PM G CH 201 
Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor.

HJS 425:  TOPICS IN JUDAIC STUDIES: RHETORIC BETWEEN ATHEN and JERUSaLEM – Jan Fernheimer
TR 9:30 PM-10:45 PM CP 201
Rhetoric is a powerful, architechtonic art that often gets maligned in colloquial English by its association with “bullshit” or empty speech.  Yet the tenets of rhetorical theory have allowed for both the analysis and production of powerful symbolic texts for thousands of years. In this course we will investigate the history of rhetoric in Ancient Greece and Israel to explore the productive space between Greco-Roman and Jewish rhetorical traditions. We will also learn about contemporary debates in rhetorical historiography as well as contrastive and comparative approaches to studies in rhetorical history and theory.  Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement or consent of instructor.

WRD 110-001-012, -201 (online):  COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION I
See online catalog for days/times/instructors/locations.
Composition & Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills. Same as CIS 110.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication I

WRD 111-001-071, -201 (online), -401, -402: COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION II
See online catalog for days/times/instructors/locations and for Wired classes in Keeneland.  
Composition & Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences. Same as CIS 111.  Note that sections 003, 019, 025, 029, 032, 043, and 061 are WIRED courses with controlled enrollment.  Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110.  Fulfills UK Core requirement: Composition & Communication II

WRD 203-001-030, 401-404:  BUSINESS WRITING
See online catalog for days/times/instructors
This course provides instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement.  Prereq: Completion of Composition and Communication requirement.

WRD 204-001:  TECHNICAL WRITING – Brian McNely
TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM Young Library B35
This course provides instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis is placed on precision, clarity, and conciseness in preparing rhetorically effective letters, proposals, reports, and presentations for specific audiences. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement.  Prereq:  Completion of Composition and Communication requirement. 

 

 

Fall 2012

A&S 100-006: COMPOSING WITH VISUALS – Rachel Elliott 

MW 4:00 PM-6:00 PM LCLI 004B Runs 8/22/12 – 10/17/12 This eight week studio class focuses on the visual aspect of digital communication skills. Students will create visuals to explore identities, tell stories, and interpret information. A variety of high and low tech media will be used with hands-on practice in digital photography, document design, and creating charts, maps, and info-graphics. This is a 2-credit course. 

A&S 100-007: COMPOSING WITH VISUALS – Rachel Elliott 

MW 4:00 PM-6:00 PM LCLI 004B Runs 10/22/12 – 12/12/12 

This eight week studio class focuses on the visual aspect of digital communication skills. Students will create visuals to explore identities, tell stories, and interpret information. A variety of high and low tech media will be used with hands-on practice in digital photography, document design, and creating charts, maps, and info-graphics. This is a 2-credit course. 

 

A&S 300-003: PUBLIC ADVOCACY (WRD 422) – Elizabeth Connors-Manke 

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM FB 307A 

This course examines the work that writing does in the world by connecting the study of persuasion in specific social movements, campaigns, and genres with opportunities for students to create texts and campaigns. This course may offer a historical or contemporary focus, and may examine local, regional, national, or transnational movements. 

 

A&S 300-004: WRITING CENTER PEER TUTORING (WRD 324) – Judith Prats 

MWF 1:00 PM-1:50 PM CB 313 

An undergraduate seminar that prepares qualified undergraduate students to become engaged and effective peer consultants in the UK Writing Center. Students in the course are actively involved in reading, writing, listening, observing, speaking, researching, and presenting as they become immersed in the theory and practice of Writing Center consulting. 

 

A&S 300-005: SOCIAL MEDIA: THEORY, CULTURE, POLITICS, PRACTICE (WRD 210) – Adam Banks 

TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM RMB 323 

The course examines how social media and the writing practices we employ influence notions of what it means to participate in community, society, and public discourse. Students will compose across different social media platforms and explore theoretical literature to examine the ways these tools are evolving.

 

A&S 300-006: DIGITAL COMPOSING (WRD 408) – Jeffrey Rice 

TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM LCLI 004B 

This course provides instruction in generating and creating digital projects in various media. Students will learn how to integrate research and rhetorical skills with digital media in order to create personal, professional, or community-based projects. Projects may include video production, website creation, and usage of social media tools. 

 

A&S 300-007: INTRO TO WRITING, RHETORIC, AND DIGITAL MEDIA (WRD 300) – Roxanne Mountford 

TR 2:00 PM-3:15 PM FB 306A 

This course uses a rhetorical foundation to introduce students to the theoretical and practical challenges to using writing and digital media. Students may examine the theoretical, ethical, and stylistic issues connected to writing in public, analytical, and personal contexts. 

 

ENG 205-001: INTERMEDIATE WRITING – Joshua Abboud 

MWF 10:00 AM-10:50 AM CB 211 

An open topics writing course focused on rhetorical analysis of issues of academic, political, social, or cultural significance. Students will interpret, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies employed in print and digital texts. This course will develop a practical understanding of writing through multimedia platforms and artifacts. Students will learn how to apply rhetorical concepts in order to produce and publish to the web in a range of media such as digital video and photography, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and comics. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

ENG 205-002: INTERMEDIATE WRITING – Steven Alvarez 

MWF 12:00 PM-12:50 PM CB 211 

An open topics writing course focused on rhetorical analysis of issues of academic, political, social, or cultural significance. Students will interpret, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies employed in print and digital texts. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

ENG 205-003: INTERMEDIATE WRITING – Amy Anderson 

MW 4:00 PM-5:15 PM CB 316 

What do Jimmy Fallon and Geoffrey Chaucer have in common? How about John Gower and Girl Talk? The answer is remix. This course will examine the remix phenomenon, beginning with its roots in Roman and medieval literature and moving up to modern manifestations in the music industry. Remix draws on the rhetorical concepts of imitatio and compilatio, and we’ll explore these as tools for meaning-making and cultural critique. We'll also look at the ways that copyright laws complicate modern remix, and consider what the digital future might hold. Our texts will range from the tales of Ovid and Geoffrey Chaucer (who hath a blog that we will check out) to YouTube mashups and remixed music tracks. We'll apply what we've learned to produce a variety of meaning-making texts, including rhetorical analysis essays and multimodal remixes. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

ENG 205-004: INTERMEDIATE WRITING – Craig Crowder 

TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM CB 211 

An open topics writing course focused on rhetorical analysis of issues of academic, political, social, or cultural significance. Students will interpret, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies employed in print and digital texts. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

ENG 301-001 and 002: STYLE FOR WRITERS – Brandy Scalise 

MWF 11:00 AM-11:50 AM CB 211 and MWF 1:00 PM-1:50 PM CB 211 

This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others. While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing. Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination

subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement and consent of instructor. 

 

ENG 306-001: INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONS IN WRITING (WRD 306) – Brian McNely 

TR 9:30AM-10:45AM CB 211 

This course offers an introduction to and preparation for careers in the teaching of writing, professional writing, publishing, and digital media. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

ENG 401-001: SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING: GRAPHIC NOVEL REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT – Janice Fernheimer 

TR 12:30 PM-1:45 PM CB 239 

Though Israel/Palestine, peace, conflict, and the Middle East appear frequently in the daily news, people often don’t understand what all the fuss is about, and why the conflict(s) appear so seemingly unsolvable. This course will offer a unique opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the many conflicts within and between Israeli and Palestinian societies by looking at them through the lens of graphic narratives. Since the graphic genre is a relatively new literary development, we will pay careful attention to how it offers new affordances and limitations for representing these complex relationships. Students will also have the opportunity to interact with J.T. Waldman, illustrator for Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me, when he visits our class and the UK campus in October. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor. 

 

ENG 401-002: SPECIAL TOPCIS IN WRITING: WORK STORIES – THE RHETORIC OF LABOR – Katherine Rogers-Carpenter 

TR 9:30 AM-10:45 AM POT 09 

If the bureau of labor statistics is right, Americans spend roughly one third of their waking hours working. And, while we may complain about our pay or bosses, most of us don’t give work much serious thought. However, writing is one way to explain work life and give it meaning. In this course, we will look at what other writers have to say about employment and labor. We will also develop our own non-fiction essays which explore how work figures in our own lives. Some authors, like Robert Frost have elevated work through poetry and prose. Others, like Horatio Alger and Dale Carnegie wrote to validate a national narrative about opportunity in the United States. Still others, like Mother Jones, W.E.B. Dubois, and A. Philip Randolph used writing to expose and rectify labor problems. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor. 

 

ENG 401-003/ENG 601: SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING: WRITINGTRAVEL – Randall Roorda 

TR 2:00 PM-3:15 PM CB 211 

This course in writing and reading takes travel as a subject, key term and activity, in at least three senses: writing about travel; travel writing as genre; writing as travel, characterized by movement and discovery. This will be a loose-limbed, peripatetic, participatory class, as befits its theme, yet one involving issues and desires of long standing and great moment, to which the theme is portal. May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor. 

 

WRD 110-001-070, -201 (online), -401: COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION I 

See online catalog for days/times/instructors and for Wired classes in Keeneland and for CURRENTS classes that the Dean has put together (courses with a cohort of students). Additional information about the CURRENTS sections will be available at a later date. 

Composition and Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills. Same as CIS 110. Note that sections 005, 020, 026, 037, 041, and 060 are WIRED courses with controlled enrollment. 

 

WRD 111-001-038, -401: COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION II 

See online catalog for days/times/instructors and for Wired classes in Keeneland and for CURRENTS classes that the Dean has put together (courses with a cohort of students). Additional information about the CURRENTS sections will be available at a later date. 

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences. Same as CIS 111. Note that sections 004, 026, and 033 are WIRED courses with controlled enrollment. Prereq: WRD 110 or CIS 110 

 

WRD 203-001-013, 401, 402: BUSINESS WRITING 

See online catalog for days/times 

Instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of University Writing requirement or new general education communications (6 hr) sequence. 

 

WRD 204-401: TECHNICAL WRITING 

TR 6:00 PM-7:15 PM POT 113 

Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on precision, clarity, and conciseness in preparing rhetorically effective letters, proposals, reports, and presentations for specific audiences. Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement. Prereq: Completion of University writing (Composition and Communication) requirement. 

 

Spring 2012

A&S 100-002: SPECIAL INTRO COURSE:  STUDIO:  COMPOSING WITH VISUALS

Instructor: Rachel Elliott

Meeting Pattern:  8-week Course – recurring weekly on Mondays and Wednesdays, from Monday, February 13, 2012 through Wednesday, April 04, 2012; 4:30PM - 6:30PM in Fine Arts Graphics (LCLI 004B)

Course Overview:  Composing with Visuals - an eight week studio class focusing on the visual aspect of digital communication skills. Students will create visuals to explore identities, tell stories, and interpret information. A variety of high and low tech media will be used with hands-on practice in digital photography, document design, and creating charts, maps, and info-graphics.  This is a 2-credit course.

ENG 104-001:  WRITING: AN ACCELERATED FOUNDATIONAL COURSE

Instructor:  TBD

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 9:00AM – 9:50AM

Course Overview:  This intensive course in writing emphasizes critical inquiry and research, formulation of academic writing projects, and orientation to university study. Instruction and practice in reading critically, thinking logically, responding to texts, developing research skills, writing substantial essay through systematic revision, addressing specific consequences, developing a fluent, precise, and versatile prose style, and expressing ideas in standard and correct English. Focus on topics pertinent to university disciplines, activities, and environs.

WRD 110-001-006 and 201 (online): COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION I

Instructors:  TDB

Meeting Pattern:  (vary)

Course Description:  Composition and Communication I is the first course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop critical thinking and information literacy skills within an academic context that emphasizes the problems confronting educated citizens of the twenty- first century. Students will practice composing, critiquing, and revising ideas for audiences in oral, written, and visual formats, and will work in small groups to develop interpersonal communication skills. Same as CIS 110.

WRD 111-001-077 and 401-402:  COMPOSITION & COMMUNICATION II

Instructors:  TBD

Meeting Patterns:  (vary)

Course Description:  Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research. In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and propose solutions based on well-developed arguments. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modes; and work effectively in groups (in pairs and small groups). A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later in digital projects intended for various public audiences. Same as CIS 111.

WRD 203-001-026, 401-404:  BUSINESS WRITING

Instructors:  TBD

Meeting Patterns:  (vary)

Course Description:  Instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

WRD 204-401:  TECHNICAL WRITING

Instructor:  TDB

Meeting Pattern:  MW 5:30PM – 6:45PM

Course Description:  Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

ENG 205-001 (WRD 205): INTERMEDIATE WRITING (TOPICS IN RHETORIC & WRITING): DIGITAL MEMORY

Instructor:  K.J. Rawson

Meeting Pattern:  TR 9:30AM – 10:45AM in a Mac computer lab

Course Overview:  Unlike our grandparents’ dusty journals or their faded photo albums, we are collecting our history and our memories on hard drives and in cyberspace, measured in gigabytes rather than shoeboxes. In this course we'll team up with UK Special Collections to learn first-hand about digitization and the Kentucky Digital Library and our class will create an online digital exhibit. Students will also create history by attempting to capture what it’s like to be a typical UK student now through audio interviews in the style of StoryCorps. Our course materials will be a diverse range of texts, audio, and still and moving images.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

https://www.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/WRD%20205_%20Digital%20Memory...

 

Listen to a description.

ENG 205-002 (WRD 205): INTERMEDIATE WRITING (TOPICS IN RHETORIC & WRITING): Rhetorics of Violence and Non-violence

Instructor:  Elizabeth Connors-Manke

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 11:00AM – 11:50AM

Course Description:  This writing course will take as its theme the rhetorics of violence and non-violence. As the shootings in Arizona in January of 2001 remind us, how we frame discussion—public or private—effects the type of action that we imagine is possible in the world. Reading across cultures, we will consider texts from the U.S., Europe, and Asia, including writings from Martin Luther King, Jr., Mahatma Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, Alice Walker’s novel Meridian, the film Blood Diamond, the poetry of Wendell Berry, Holocaust-era writing of Viktor Frankl, and the Hindu epic the Bhagavad Gita. We’ll also survey current events and public discourse to understand how the way we write shapes the ways we act. In particular, we’ll analyze how styles, genres, and rhetorical strategies convey violence or non-violence; we’ll practice ways of re-shaping our prose to promote civil discourse. Coursework will include lots of reading and writing, including regular response papers, journaling, written/oral/visual web posts, two major writing projects, and a collaborative class project.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

Listen to a description.

ENG 205-003 (WRD 205): INTERMEDIATE WRITING (TOPICS IN RHETORIC & WRITING): SCREEN/WRITING

Instructor:  Joshua Abboud

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 10:00AM – 10:50AM

Course Description: Screens have become a critical part of writing technologies and help determine how information gets relayed. We will examine historical developments and rhetorical issues of screens: from the shadows of Plato's cave, to the darkened movie theaters, and arriving at   computer monitors, tablet computers, and smart phone touch screens. We will ask how screens have structured spaces of writing and framed knowledge and communication.  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

Listen to a description.

ENG 205-004 (WRD 205): INTERMEDIATE WRITING (TOPICS IN RHETORIC & WRITING): Rhetorics of Violence and Non-violence

Instructor:  Elizabeth Connors-Manke

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 1:00PM – 1:50PM

Course Description:  same as ENG 205-002

ENG 205-005 (WRD 205): INTERMEDIATE WRITING (TOPICS IN RHETORIC & WRITING): Environmental Rhetoric in the United States

Instructor:  Erik Reece

Meeting Pattern:  TR 2:00PM – 3:15PM

Course Description:  This course is an introduction to the vital American genre called environmental writing. Students will study its history, dating back to Thoreau, and undertake their own environmental writing projects which will engage current and local issues. (This course serves as a core class in the new Environmental and Sustainability Studies major).  Course fulfills the Graduate Writing Requirement for those who have met the University Writing Requirement.

A&S 300-001 (WRD 420): TOPICS IN RHETORICAL THEORY AND HISTORY:  FEMINIST RHETORICS

Instructor:  Katherine Rogers-Carpenter

Meeting Pattern:  TR 3:30PM – 4:45PM

Course Overview:  We will explore the origins and originators of feminist rhetoric; how feminist and masculinist traditions differ (along with what they share); and how feminist rhetoric and theory are connected to women’s movements.  After beginning the semester with the works of ancient rhetors Aspasia and Sappho, we will shift to nineteenth-century American works by Margaret Fuller, Ida B. Wells, and Sojourner Truth.  Finally we will turn to contemporary writers such as Adrienne Rich, Gloria Steinem, and Rebecca Walker.

Listen to a description.

A&S 300-002 (WRD 324):  WRITING CENTER PEER TUTORING

Instructor:  Judith Prats Director, University of Kentucky Writing Center

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 11:00AM – 11:50AM

Course Overview:  The course is an undergraduate seminar that prepares qualified undergraduate students to become engaged and effective peer consultants in the UK Writing Center. Students in the course will be actively involved in reading, writing, listening, observing, speaking, researching, presenting, etc. as they become immersed in the theory and practice of Writing Center consulting. Students who complete the course will be eligible to serve as accomplished peer tutors in the Writing Center.

A&S 300-003 (WRD 320):  Survival Technology:  The Rhetoric and Literacy Practices of Black Sermon, Standup, and Storytelling Traditions

Instructor:  Dr. Adam Banks

Meeting Pattern:  TR 12:30PM – 1:45PM

Course Overview:  What do Martin Luther King, Jr, Maxine Waters, and HipHop all have in common?  Who were the first rappers?  What made Richard Pryor and Moms Mabley two of the most brilliant comics in African American history?  How have African American oral traditions been a means of both resistance to, and participation in American society?  This course is both an exploration of the range in the forms and content of African American oral traditions, and a beginning exploration of the rhetorical practices involved in the Black sermon, standup, and storytelling traditions. What can we learn about navigating a technologically driven society by reconnecting with these traditions?

A&S 300-005 (WRD 212): Social Media: Theory, Culture, Politics, Practice

Instructor:  Dr. Adam Banks

Meeting Pattern:  TR 2:00PM – 3:15PM

Course Overview:  This is an era where we feel everything shifting and sense some of the patterns, but one where we’re never entirely sure what’s going on because the shifts are so sudden and so constant.  First the internet seemed to change and challenge everything about culture and even individual identity; then the rise of social media as a major part of internet culture seemed to change all the rules yet again.  We’ll start to figure out what it all might mean in this class:  we’ll use and experiment with all kinds of social media (sometimes all at the same time), and we’ll examine some of the theoretical literature to explore the ways these tools and larger systems are evolving—and forcing society to evolve with it.  We’ll actually use the stuff—explore new networks, learn how to use new tools, and share our experiences with them.

A&S 300-006 (WRD 412): INTERMEDIATE DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION

Instructor:  Dr. Thomas Marksbury

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 2:00PM – 2:50PM

Course Overview:  This a hybrid course dedicated to first critically examining a number of (mostly) contemporary documentary films and then applying that study, workshop fashion, to the construction of a documentary of one’s own.  We’ll begin by looking as closely as possible at a number of non-fiction narratives which employ a variety of approaches to a wide range of subjects.  These might include such films as Spike Lee’s rightly furious polemic When the Levees Broke:  A Requiem in Four Acts, which meticulously pieces together the political, social, and emotional ramifications of Hurricane Katrina for the city of New Orleans and Terry Zwigoff’s Crumb, a variation on the traditional artist profile which locates the cartoonist within the confines of his dysfunctional family.  For the second half, the emphasis will shift to a hands-on and mutually supportive workshop environment.  Having isolated a subject and generated some raw material, we now begin to focus on the documentary writing process in all of its forms and functions—research, filming, interviewing, and editing, the delicate balancing act of shaping without distorting the material.

A&S 300-008 (WRD 311): Rhetorical History of the Documentary

Instructor:  Dr. Thomas Marksbury

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 12PM – 12:50PM

Course Overview:  This course is designed to trace the evolution, refinement, formalization and eventual deconstruction of the documentary film from the inception of the Lumieree brothers to the dazzling deceptions of Banksy, examining both the acknowledged canonical masterpieces and a few other roads not quite as well mapped.  Although the emphasis will be on the development of the American documentary, we will also be looking into contributions from France, Canada, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, and Russia as we try to cultivate a sense of how these various countries and cultures have interpollinated each other.  Such movements as the Soviet Avant Garde, Direct Cinema, and Free Cinema will be examined to connect individual works with more collective lines of influence.

ENG 301-001 (WRD 301):  STYLE FOR WRITERS

Instructor:  Brandy Scalise

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 11:00AM – 11:50AM

Course Description:  This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others.  While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing.  Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace.  Prereq:  Fulfillment of University Writing requirement.

ENG 401/601-001 (WRD 401/601):  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  THE ESSAY

Instructor:  Randall Roorda

Meeting Pattern:  MWF 2:00PM – 2:50PM

Course Description:  Studies of special topics in writing, in areas such as literary nonfiction (essays), responding to literature, cultural critique, and composing law and justice. Topics announced the preceding semester.  May be repeated under different subtitles to a maximum of six credits.

ENG 401-002 (WRD 401):  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING: Writing About Religion and Spirituality

Instructor:  Erik A. Reece

Meeting Pattern:  TR 9:30AM – 10:45AM

Course Description:  “We tell ourselves stories in order to live,” wrote Joan Didion. From the beginning, those stories have asked the questions, “Where do we come from?” and “Why are we here?” And from the beginning, we have tried to answer those questions, first through oral stories and later through written narratives. The religious impulse has often been a catalyst for writing, and it will be in this course. We will examine contemporary writers on religion such as Annie Dillard, Ann Lemott and Wendell Berry. Then we will embark on our own nonfiction essays that will include meditations, personal narratives, profiles of spiritual places and people, and polemics. (This is NOT a course in religious proselytizing, but rather one in which we will write honestly about the great questions of belief and disbelief). 

ENG 401-003 (WRD 401):  SPECIAL TOPICS IN WRITING:  WRITING ABOUT ANIMALS

Instructor:  Roxanne Mountford

Meeting Pattern:  TR 2:00PM – 3:15PM

Course Description:  What makes us different from animals?  This question has engaged philosophers, scientists, animal trainers, and ordinary people who love wildlife or have animal companions.  In this course, we will read widely about animals, encounter them in the local environment, and write about them in various forms of nonfiction prose, all the while exploring our assumptions about them.  Students will submit at least one piece of writing produced in this course to a journal, newspaper, or magazine for publication.

ENG 405-001 (WRD 405):  EDITING ENGLISH PROSE

(This course is not yet in the online catalog.)

Instructor:  Rhonda Reeves, Editor of ACE Magazine

Meeting Pattern:  TR 11:00AM – 12:15PM

Course Description:  This course is designed for students interested in the basics of editing and publishing and offers instruction and extensive practice in editing and revising both the student’s own writing and the prose works of others.  In addition to learning techniques of revision, verification of sources, and preparation of manuscripts, student will be expected to learn about the editing profession generally and to follow trends in editing and publishing.  Prereq:  ENG 301 or ENG 306 or consent of instructor.

Fall 2011

WRD 110 COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION I

Composition and Communication I is a course in speaking and writing emphasizing critical inquiry and research. Throughout the course, students are encouraged students to explore their place in the broader community and take a stance on issues of public concern—that is, to begin to view themselves as engaged citizens. Students will engage in reflective thinking and analysis, conduct primary research in the community and secondary research using Library resources, and learn how to write and speak effectively about a local issue not only for their classmates but also for audiences beyond the classroom. A significant component of the class will be learning to use visuals and online resources to enhance writing and oral presentations. Over the course of the semester, class members can expect to work independently, with a partner, or with a small group of classmates to investigate, share findings, and compose presentations of their research, as well as to practice and evaluate interpersonal and team dynamics in action.

WRD 111 COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION II

Composition and Communication II is the second of two general education courses focused on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development emphasizing critical inquiry and research.  In this course, students will explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation over those issues, and ultimately propose solutions based on well-developed arguments.  Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modalities; and work effectively in groups (dyads and small groups).  To learn to analyze a public issue using rhetorical analysis, the entire class will explore together one contemporary social issue and related texts about it. A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later to communicate mass mediated messages to various public audiences.  Over the course of the semester, class members can expect to work independently, with a partner, and in a small group (team) to investigate, share findings, and compose and deliver presentations, as well as to practice and evaluate interpersonal and team dynamics in action.

A&S 300.016 RHETORIC BETWEEN ATHENS AND JERUSALEM

Rhetoric is a powerful, architechtonic art that often gets maligned in colloquial English by its association with “bullshit” or empty speech. Yet the tenets of rhetorical theory have allowed for both the analysis and production of powerful symbolic texts for thousands of years. In this course we will investigate the history of rhetoric in Ancient Greece and Israel to explore the productive space between Greco-Roman and Jewish/Hebraic rhetorical traditions. We will also learn about contemporary debates in rhetorical historiography as well as contrastive and comparative approaches to studies in rhetorical history and theory. Required texts and materials may include Aristotle's Rhetoric and Nichomachean Ethics; Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus; Megiallat Esther; and more. Students will write several short reading response essays, a mid-term, and a major research project.

A&S 300.017 VISUAL RHETORIC

We live in a world of persuasion and argument. At each turn, we are bombarded by messages in posters, commercials, flyers, books, articles, speeches, TV Shows, movies, and songs. The very buildings we live, work, and play inside shape our actions through discrete messages. While the majority of these arguments are visual, academic inquiry often stresses the analysis ofpurely textual artifacts. In this course, we will reverse that tendency.
This course constitutes an inquiry into rhetoric by other means – visual means. We will discuss not only the history of visuals in American culture, but also the history of their study. We will also keep that word, “inquiry,” at the forefront as we progress. We do not enter this course with answers, but with questions.
We will concern ourselves with artifacts from popular and academic cultures, including comic books, art installations, paintings, buildings, academic books and articles, advertisements, and films.

ENG 102 WRITING II  

Argumentative writing. Emphasis on development of a fluent, precise, and versatile prose style. Continued instruction and practice in reading critically, thinking logically, responding to texts, developing research skills, writing substantial essays through systematic revision, addressing specific audiences, expressing ideas in standard and correct English. Prereq: ENG 101 or equivalent. Notes: (a) Credit not available by special examination; (b) ENG 101 and ENG 102 may not be taken concurrently. 

ENG 104 WRITING: AN ACCELERATED FOUNDATIONAL COURSE  

An intensive course in writing emphasizing critical inquiry and research, formulation of academic writing projects, and orientation to university study. Instruction and practice in reading critically, thinking logically, responding to texts, developing research skills, writing substantial essay through systematic revision, addressing specific consequences, developing a fluent, precise, and versatile prose style,and expressing ideas in standard and correct English. Focus on topics pertinent to university disciplines, activities, and environs. Notes:(a) credit or exemption not available by CLEP or by special departmental examination; (b) exemption possible by ACT, SAT, or AP English Language exam score.

ENG 203 BUSINESS WRITING

Instruction and experience in writing for business, industry, and government. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. Prereq: Completion of University Writing requirement.

ENG 204 TECHNICAL WRITING

Instruction and experience in writing for science and technology. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, and effectiveness in preparing letters, memos, and reports for specific audiences. Prereq: Completion of University Writing requirement.

ENG 205 INTERMEDIATE WRITING

Instruction and experience in nonfictional writing. The emphasis is on clarity, conciseness, and effective form in abstracts, in case studies,and in literature reviews for special audiences. Assignments include research and oral presentations. Prereq: Completion of the University Writing requirement.

ENG 301 STYLE FOR WRITERS

This course is designed for those who wish to improve their own writing style or the style of others. While the course may include some account of historical changes in prose style and require some stylistic analysis of literary texts, the emphasis is on editing contemporary prose, both in exercises and in the students’ own writing. Students will learn and practice principles such as economy, coordination, subordination, precision, parallelism, balance, coherence, rhythm, clarity, and grace. Prereq: Fulfillment of the University Writing requirement and consent of instructor.

ENG 306 INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONS IN WRITING

This course overviews a few of the many possible professions in writing. The main focus will be in-class presentations by invited speakers who will provide insight to their work and workplace through talk, example, and class discussion. Assignments for the course will involve reflective and exploratory writing in and about the various genres presented, and emphasis will be placed on rhetorical variation. Professions in Writing explored in class may include activist writing, college teaching in rhetoric and composition, community writing, computers and writing, editing, environmental writing, free-lance writing, grant writing, literary journalism, magazine writing, new media writing, nonfiction writing, professional writing, publicity, publishing, science writing, teaching English as a second language, teaching writing in public schools, technical writing, writing about technology, writing for nonprofits, and/or others. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of University Writing Requirement.

ENG 405 EDITING ENGLISH PROSE

This course is designed for students interested in the basics of editing and publishing and offers instruction and extensive practice in editing and revising both the student’s own writing and the prose works of others. In addition to learning techniques of revision, verification of sources, and preparation of manuscripts, students will be expected to learn about the editing profession generally and to follow trends in editing and publishing. Not for students with writing deficiencies. Prereq: ENG 306 or ENG 301 or consent of instructor.

 

 

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